Duncan’s Economic Blog

The 1970s Political Economic Breakdown: Suggestions needed

Posted in Uncategorized by duncanseconomicblog on July 16, 2009

Right…

Being the exciting person that I am, I have set myself the task of trying to understand exactly what went wrong in the 1970s.

Should be an interesting Summer project.

So – could any readers suggest some good reading?

I’ve got a copy of Burk and Cairncross’s ‘Good Bye Great Britain’, plus biographies of various politicians.

What else should I get?

11 Responses

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  1. thelocalgovernmentofficer said, on July 16, 2009 at 8:43 am

    http://tcbh.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/pdf_extract/9/1/139 ?

  2. Daniel said, on July 16, 2009 at 10:55 am

    ermmmm……Labour were in government and managed to bankrupt us?

  3. crossland said, on July 16, 2009 at 12:17 pm

    ‘Smear’ by Robin Ramsay and Stephen Dorril
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Smear-Wilson-Secret-Stephen-Dorril/dp/0586217134

    About the Lilson plots but also the ascendancy of ‘the City’ and the paranoia that was endemic from both left and right.

  4. Will M said, on July 16, 2009 at 2:37 pm

    What else you should get?

    how’s about this?

  5. chris said, on July 16, 2009 at 5:24 pm

    How about Marglin and Schor’s The Golden Age of Capitalism or Armstrong, Glyn and Harrison’s Capitalism since World War II for starters?

  6. CharlieMcmenamin said, on July 16, 2009 at 7:34 pm

    Dunc,

    you have to remember everyone pretended to be more left wing that they actually were: I still chuckle at that TV interview with the young Charles Clarke as NUS President in which he said, ” I suppose you could describe me as a marxist with a small ‘m'”.

    Go and check this lot – http://www.hegemonics.co.uk/1970s.html – a broadly Euro-Comm view of the world. I think you’d find the stuff around inflation and incomes Policy interesting, but given you’re a mere slip of a lad you’re probably going to have to translate it out of such 1970s marxoid language. This wasn’t the mainstream tho’. Anything by Andrew Glyn – up to and including Capitalism unleashed – is also worth reading. & you could do worse that revisiting old classics like The Forward March of Labour Halted.

  7. Paul said, on July 17, 2009 at 8:37 am

    Try Coates and Hillard’s UK Economic Decline;Key Texts (1995) for starters, nad it’s only £2 at amazon

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/U-K-Economic-Decline-Coates/dp/toc/0133427757

    I like David Harvey’s recent (history of neoliberalism) on the social forces of 60’s feeding into the acceptance of the new anti-state/emergent neoliberal narrative

    For classic mid 70’s right wing analysis of what was going wrong look at Anthony King’s overload thesis paper (1975) – http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119653660/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0 (let me know if u want a pdf

  8. Clifford Singer said, on July 17, 2009 at 8:39 am

    “When the Lights Went Out” by Andy Beckett looks good.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/When-Lights-Went-Out-Seventies/

  9. duncanseconomicblog said, on July 17, 2009 at 9:18 am

    Thanks for these.

  10. Tim Worstall said, on July 17, 2009 at 2:53 pm

    Anything you can find on fascist and or corporatist economics and economies.

    That combaination of Big Govt, Big Labour and Big Business in the 70s was the closest we came in the UK to that type of economy. And what caused all the problems.

  11. ydue said, on July 17, 2009 at 8:08 pm

    Michael Stewart’s Keynes in the 1990s has a good short background on the late 70s, though it concentrates on the Tories’ actions in the 80s and early 90s – http://www.amazon.co.uk/Keynes-Penguin-economics-Michael-Stewart/dp/0140179607


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